This Inuit shovel was carved from a walrus shoulder blade. The Inuit, who inhabit the Arctic regions of Greenland, Canada, and the US, are well known for their sea faring and hunting skills and a large part of their diet comes from marine animals. Walrus are too powerful to be hunted by one person so Inuit hunters worked in teams. They and their families used most parts of the walrus, including the skin, bones, and ivory, in ingenious ways, as with this shovel.

This Inuit shovel was carved from a walrus shoulder blade. The Inuit, who inhabit the Arctic regions of Greenland, Canada, and the US, are well known for their sea faring and hunting skills and a large part of their diet comes from marine animals. Walrus are too powerful to be hunted by one person so Inuit hunters worked in teams. They and their families used most parts of the walrus, including the skin, bones, and ivory, in ingenious ways, as with this shovel.

We’re back

We’re back

We’ve been neglecting this blog for a long time, but we have not forgotten you! Our Crocker Land research and exhibit development is going into high gear now, with only 8 months to go until it opens. We have already begun in a sense, with a series of photograph exhibits in our foyer. The first of these: Off to a Rocky Start: The Crocker Land Expedition, 1913has just come down, but will reappear…

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framingcanada
framingcanada:

Arctic Highlanders who spent the winter 1923-1924 at Craig Harbour, Ellesmere Island, N.W.T. (Nunavut), ca. 1924. (via Archives Search - Library and Archives Canada) Credit: Roy Tash/Library and Archives Canada/PA-102281

According to Lyle Dick (2001 Muskox Land, figure 60,  p. 280) these are Padlunga (Patdlunguaq), Kishook (Qisuk) and Inacosea (Inogusiaq), Inughuit from NW Greenland who worked for the RCMP at Craig Harbour.

framingcanada:

Arctic Highlanders who spent the winter 1923-1924 at Craig Harbour, Ellesmere Island, N.W.T. (Nunavut), ca. 1924. (via Archives Search - Library and Archives Canada)
Credit: Roy Tash/Library and Archives Canada/PA-102281

According to Lyle Dick (2001 Muskox Land, figure 60,  p. 280) these are Padlunga (Patdlunguaq), Kishook (Qisuk) and Inacosea (Inogusiaq), Inughuit from NW Greenland who worked for the RCMP at Craig Harbour.

kqedscience
kqedscience:

Arctic Algae Offer New Insights on Prehistoric Climate Data
“As scientists work on better climate models to help us deal with global warming, there are only two places to gather more data: the present and the past. The present crawls along at its usual pace, producing its daily trickle of information, but the past promises to yield buckets of data in the right archives. A new paper has opened up a long-needed archive for the high northern ocean, recorded in the annual “tree rings” of red coralline algae.”
Learn more from geologist Andrew Alden at KQED Science.

kqedscience:

Arctic Algae Offer New Insights on Prehistoric Climate Data

As scientists work on better climate models to help us deal with global warming, there are only two places to gather more data: the present and the past. The present crawls along at its usual pace, producing its daily trickle of information, but the past promises to yield buckets of data in the right archives. A new paper has opened up a long-needed archive for the high northern ocean, recorded in the annual “tree rings” of red coralline algae.”

Learn more from geologist Andrew Alden at KQED Science.

In 1927 Donald MacMillan brought the first Model-T Ford modified into a snow machine to Labrador. He left it behind when he returned south in 1928 and it has been in the woods, vulnerable to the elements and souvenir hunters, ever since. Now archaeologist Jamie Brake of the Nunatsiavut Government is working on a project to recover and restore it. You can here him talking about the project on the OKalaKatiget Society broadcast here.

In 1927 Donald MacMillan brought the first Model-T Ford modified into a snow machine to Labrador. He left it behind when he returned south in 1928 and it has been in the woods, vulnerable to the elements and souvenir hunters, ever since. Now archaeologist Jamie Brake of the Nunatsiavut Government is working on a project to recover and restore it. You can here him talking about the project on the OKalaKatiget Society broadcast here.