This bird spear is another example of the walrus as a source of material for tools. The triple pronged head is made from carved walrus ivory while the shaft is made of driftwood rubbed with red ochre. Wood is a scarce resource in the treeless Arctic tundra and so Inuit craftspeople often used driftwood or an alternate material (such as bone) in its place. Of particular interest to me was the delicate knot work that helps hold the prongs to the shaft.

This bird spear is another example of the walrus as a source of material for tools. The triple pronged head is made from carved walrus ivory while the shaft is made of driftwood rubbed with red ochre. Wood is a scarce resource in the treeless Arctic tundra and so Inuit craftspeople often used driftwood or an alternate material (such as bone) in its place. Of particular interest to me was the delicate knot work that helps hold the prongs to the shaft.

   This Inuit shovel was carved from a walrus shoulder blade. The Inuit, who inhabit the Arctic regions of Greenland, Canada, and the US, are well known for their sea faring and hunting skills and a large part of their diet comes from marine animals. Walrus are too powerful to be hunted by one person so Inuit hunters worked in teams. They and their families used most parts of the walrus, including the skin, bones, and ivory, in ingenious ways, as with this shovel.

This Inuit shovel was carved from a walrus shoulder blade. The Inuit, who inhabit the Arctic regions of Greenland, Canada, and the US, are well known for their sea faring and hunting skills and a large part of their diet comes from marine animals. Walrus are too powerful to be hunted by one person so Inuit hunters worked in teams. They and their families used most parts of the walrus, including the skin, bones, and ivory, in ingenious ways, as with this shovel.

While we have the occasional photograph of a cow in our collection, they hardly qualify as Arctic. Instead, I offer you this adorable baby, Ole, with his mother Ane Petersen in the spring of 1923. Ane has with her a tin of Sheffield powdered milk, courtesy of Donald MacMillan, but I don’t believe that it was the source of Ole’s robust good health.

While we have the occasional photograph of a cow in our collection, they hardly qualify as Arctic. Instead, I offer you this adorable baby, Ole, with his mother Ane Petersen in the spring of 1923. Ane has with her a tin of Sheffield powdered milk, courtesy of Donald MacMillan, but I don’t believe that it was the source of Ole’s robust good health.

Pretty interesting image for today…This bookplate, published in 1810, shows a very early European rendering of an Inuit sledge and various tools, marked “A Bone Sled, Dog Whip, Spear, & Knife of the Arctic Highlanders.”
The artist is marked as Daniel Havell, who is probably the Daniel Havell of the famous Havell family of engravers.
-M

Pretty interesting image for today…This bookplate, published in 1810, shows a very early European rendering of an Inuit sledge and various tools, marked “A Bone Sled, Dog Whip, Spear, & Knife of the Arctic Highlanders.”

The artist is marked as Daniel Havell, who is probably the Daniel Havell of the famous Havell family of engravers.

-M